Achievement made by ISRO 2012 to 2018

2012:


RISAT-1:


Radar Satellite-1 (RISAT-1) is a state of the art Microwave Remote Sensing Satellite carrying a Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) Payload operating in C-band (5.35 GHz), which enables imaging of the surface features during both day and night under all weather conditions.

GSAT-10

GSAT-10, India’s advanced communication satellite, is a high power satellite being inducted into the INSAT system. Weighing 3400 kg at lift-off, GSAT-10 is configured to carry 30 communication transponders in normal C-band, lower extended C-band and Ku-band as well as a GPS Aided GEO Augmented Navigation (GAGAN) payload operating in L1 and L5 bands. GSAT-10 is the second satellite to carry GAGAN payload after GSAT-8, which is already providing navigation services from orbit. GSAT-10 also carries a Ku-band beacon to help in accurately pointing ground antennas towards the satellite.

The 30 communication transponders onboard GSAT-10 will further augment the capacity in the INSAT system. The GAGAN payload provides the Satellite Based Augmentation System (SBAS), through which the accuracy of the positioning information obtained from the GPS satellites is improved by a network of ground based receivers and made available to the users in the country through geo-stationary satellites.

2013:


SARAL


The Satellite with ARGOS and ALTIKA (SARAL) is a joint Indo-French satellite mission for oceanographic studies. SARAL performs altimetric measurements designed to study ocean circulation and sea surface elevation.

IRNSS-1A

IRNSS-1A is the first satellite in the Indian Regional Navigation Satellite System (IRNSS). It is one of the seven satellites constituting the IRNSS space segment.

INSAT-3D

INSAT-3D is an advanced weather satellite of India configured with improved Imaging System and Atmospheric Sounder. INSAT-3D is designed for enhanced meteorological observations, monitoring of land and ocean surfaces, generating vertical profile of the atmosphere in terms of temperature and humidity for weather forecasting and disaster warning.

GSAT-7

GSAT-7 is an advanced communication satellite built by ISRO to provide wide range of service spectrum from low bit rate voice to high bit rate data communication. GSAT-7 Communication payload is designed to provide communication capabilities to users over a wide oceanic region including the Indian land-mass. The payload configuration is compatible with I-2.5K bus of ISRO. The GSAT-7 payload design includes Multiband communication.

Mars Orbiter Mission Spacecraft

Mars Orbiter Mission is India's first interplanetary mission to planet Mars with an orbiter craft designed to orbit Mars in an elliptical orbit. The Mission is primarily technological mission considering the critical mission operations and stringent requirements on propulsion and other bus systems of spacecraft. It has been configured to carry out observation of physical features of mars and carry out limited study of Martian atmosphere with following five payloads:
Mars Colour Camera (MCC)
Thermal Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (TIS)
Methane Sensor for Mars (MSM)
Mars Exospheric Neutral Composition Analyser (MENCA)
Lyman Alpha Photometer (LAP)

2014:


GSAT-14


GSAT-14 is the twenty third geostationary communication satellite of India built by ISRO. The main objectives of GSAT-14 mission are:
i) To augment the In-orbit capacity of Extended C and Ku-band transponders
ii) To provide a platform for new experiments.

IRNSS-1B

IRNSS-1B is the second dedicated navigation satellite of India. It is one of the seven satellites constituting the IRNSS space segment. Its predecessor, IRNSS-1A, was launched by PSLV-C22 in July 2013. IRNSS-1B has a lift-off mass of 1432 kg. The configuration of IRNSS-1B is similar to that of IRNSS-1A. The satellite has been realised in less than seven months after the launch of its predecessor.

IRNSS-1C

IRNSS-1C is the third navigation satellite of the seven satellites constituting the IRNSS space segment. Its predecessors, IRNSS-1A and IRNSS-1B were launched by PSLV-C22 and PSLV-C24 in July 2013 and April 2014 respectively. IRNSS-1C has a lift-off mass of 1425.4 kg. The configuration of IRNSS-1C is similar to that of IRNSS-1A and IRNSS-1B. The satellite has been realized in less than six months after the launch of its predecessor.

The satellite is powered by two solar arrays, which generate power up to 1,660 watts, and has a life-time of ten years. IRNSS-1C carries two types of payloads – navigation payload and ranging payload. The navigation payload of IRNSS-1C transmits navigation service signals to the users. This payload is operating in L5-band and S-band. A highly accurate Rubidium atomic clock is part of the navigation payload of the satellite. The ranging payload of IRNSS-1C consists of a C-band transponder which facilitates accurate determination of the range of the satellite. IRNSS-1C also carries Corner Cube Retro Reflectors for laser ranging.

GSAT-16

GSAT-16, an advanced communication satellite, weighing 3181.6 kg at lift-off, is being inducted into the INSAT-GSAT system. GSAT-16 is configured to carry a total of 48 communication transponders, the largest number of transponders carried by a communication satellite developed by ISRO so far, in normal C-band, upper extended C-band and Ku-band. GSAT-16 carried a Ku-band beacon as well to help accurately point ground antennas towards the satellite.

The designed on-orbit operational life of GSAT-16 is 12 years. The communication transponders on-board GSAT-16 together ensure continuity of various services currently provided by INSAT-GSAT system and serve as on-orbit spares to meet contingency requirements or for the augmentation of such services.

GSAT-16 is launched into a Geosynchronous Transfer Orbit (GTO) by Ariane-5 VA-221 launch vehicle from Kourou, French Guiana. After its injection into GTO, ISRO’s Master Control Facility (MCF) at Hassan took control of the satellite and performed the initial orbit raising manoeuvres using the satellite’s on-board Liquid Apogee Motor (LAM), finally placing it in the vicinity of circular Geostationary Orbit. After this, the deployment of appendages such as the solar panels, antennas and three axis stabilization of the satellite were performed. GSAT-16 is positioned at 55 deg East longitude in the Geostationary orbit and co-located with GSAT-8, IRNSS-1A and IRNSS-1B satellites.

Crew module Atmospheric Re-entry Experiment (CARE)

Crew Module (CM) is identified as the payload in GSLV MK-III-X/CARE Mission. CARE is the acronym for Crew module Atmospheric Re-entry Experiment. The mission would be used as a platform for testing the re-entry technologies envisaged for Crew Module including validating the performance of parachute based deceleration system. CARE is expected to enhance the understanding of blunt body re-entry aerothermodynamics and parachute deployment in cluster configuration.

The external configuration of the Crew Module to be flight tested in GSLV MK-III is same as that of manned flight.

2015:


IRNSS-1D


IRNSS-1D is the fourth navigation satellite of the seven satellites constituting the IRNSS space segment. Its predecessors, IRNSS-1A, 1B and 1C were launched by PSLV-C22, PSLV-C24 and PSLV-C26 in July 2013, April 2014 and October 2014 respectively. IRNSS-1D has a lift-off mass of 1425 kg. The configuration of IRNSS-1D is similar to that of IRNSS-1A, 1B and 1C. The satellite has been realised in less than four months after the launch of its predecessor.

The two solar panels of IRNSS-1D consisting of Ultra Triple Junction solar cells generate about 1660 Watts of electrical power. Sun and Star sensors as well as gyroscopes provide orientation reference for the satellite. Special thermal control schemes have been designed and implemented for some of the critical elements such as atomic clocks. The Attitude and Orbit Control System (AOCS) of IRNSS-1D maintains the satellite's orientation with the help of reaction wheels, magnetic torquers and thrusters. Its propulsion system consists of a Liquid Apogee Motor (LAM) and thrusters.

IRNSS-1D was launched into a sub Geosynchronous Transfer Orbit (sub GTO) with a 284 km perigee (nearest point to Earth) and 20,650 km apogee (farthest point to Earth) with an inclination of 19.2 deg with respect to the equatorial plane.

After injection into this preliminary orbit, the two solar panels of IRNSS-1D are automatically deployed in quick succession and the Master Control Facility (MCF) at Hassan takes control of the satellite and performs the initial orbit raising manoeuvres consisting of one manoeuvre at perigee (nearest point to earth) and three at apogee (farthest point to earth). For these manoeuvres, the Liquid Apogee Motor (LAM) of the satellite is used, thereby finally placing it in the circular geostationary orbit at its designated location.

GSAT-6

GSAT-6 is the twenty fifth geostationary communication satellite of India built by ISRO and twelfth in the GSAT series. Five of GSAT-6's predecessors were launched by GSLV during 2001, 2003, 2004, 2007 and 2014 respectively. After its commissioning, GSAT-6 joined the group of India's other operational geostationary satellites.

GSAT-6 Satellite provides communication through S-band payload with five spot beams covering whole India for user links and C-band with one beam. The cuboid shaped GSAT-6 has a lift-off mass of 2117 kg. Of this, propellants weigh 1132 kg and the dry mass of the satellite is 985 kg. One of the advanced features of GSAT-6 satellite is its S-Band Unfurlable Antenna of 6 m diameter. This is the largest satellite antenna realised by ISRO. This antenna is utilised for five spot beams over the Indian main land. The spot beams exploit the frequency reuse scheme to increase frequency spectrum utilization efficiency. The other advanced feature of the satellite is the 70 V bus, which is flying first time in an Indian communication satellite

Soon after its injection into GTO, the two solar arrays of GSAT-6 were automatically deployed and the Master Control Facility (MCF) at Hassan in Karnataka took control of GSAT-6. Subsequently, GSAT-6's orbit was raised to the final circular Geostationary Orbit (GSO) by firing the satellite's Liquid Apogee Motor (LAM) in stages. The satellite was declared operational after the completion of orbit raising operations, deployment of its 6 m wide sieve shaped unfurlable antenna, the satellite’s positioning in its designated orbital slot of 83 degree East longitude in the GSO and in-orbit testing of its communication payloads.

Astrosat

ASTROSAT is India’s first dedicated multi wavelength space observatory. This scientific satellite mission endeavours for a more detailed understanding of our universe. One of the unique features of ASTROSAT mission is that enables the simultaneous multi-wavelength observations of various astronomical objects with a single satellite.

ASTROSAT observes universe in the optical, Ultraviolet, low and high energy X-ray regions of the electromagnetic spectrum, whereas most other scientific satellites are capable of observing a narrow range of wavelength band. Multi-wavelength observations of ASTROSAT can be further extended with co-ordinated observations using other spacecraft and ground based observations. All major astronomy Institutions and some Universities in India are participating in these observations.

ASTROSAT with a lift-off mass of about 1513 kg was launched into a 650 km orbit inclined at an angle of 6 deg to the equator by PSLV-C30. After injection into Orbit, the two solar panels of ASTROSAT were automatically deployed in quick succession. The spacecraft control centre at Mission Operations Complex (MOX) of ISRO Telemetry, Tracking and Command Network (ISTRAC) at Bangalore manages the satellite during its mission life.

The science data gathered by five payloads of ASTROSAT are telemetered to the ground station at MOX. The data is then processed, archived and distributed by Indian Space Science Data Centre (ISSDC) located at Byalalu, near Bangalore.

The scientific objectives of ASTROSAT mission are:
To understand high energy processes in binary star systems containing neutron stars and black holes
Estimate magnetic fields of neutron stars
Study star birth regions and high energy processes in star systems lying beyond our galaxy
Detect new briefly bright X-ray sources in the sky
Perform a limited deep field survey of the Universe in the Ultraviolet region

GSAT-15

GSAT-15, India’s latest Communication Satellite is a high power satellite being inducted into the INSAT/GSAT system. Weighing 3164 kg at lift-off, GSAT-15 carried a total of 24 communication transponders in Ku-band as well as a GPS Aided GEO Augmented Navigation (GAGAN) payload operating in L1 and L5 bands. GSAT-15 is the third satellite to carry GAGAN payload after GAST-8 and GSAT-10, which are already providing navigation services from orbit. GSAT-15, carried a Ku-band beacon as well to help in accurately pointing ground antennas towards the satellite.

GSAT-15 was launched by Ariane-5 VA-227 launch vehicle from Kourou, French Guiana on early morning of November 11, 2015

2016:


IRNSS-1E


IRNSS-1E is the fifth navigation satellite of the seven satellites constituting the IRNSS space segment. Its predecessors, IRNSS-1A, 1B, 1C and 1D were launched by PSLV-C22, PSLV-C24, PSLV-C26 and PSLV-C27 in July 2013, April 2014, October 2014 and March 2015 respectively. IRNSS-1E has a lift-off mass of 1425 kg. The configuration of IRNSS-1E is similar to that of IRNSS-1A, 1B, 1C and 1D. IRNSS -1E carries two types of payloads – navigation payload and ranging payload. The navigation payload of IRNSS-1E transmits navigation service signals to the users. This payload is operating in L5-band and S-band. A highly accurate Rubidium atomic clock is part of the navigation payload of the satellite. The ranging payload of IRNSS-1E consists of a C-band transponder which facilitates accurate determination of the range of the satellite. IRNSS-1E also carries Corner Cube Retro Reflectors for laser ranging. PSLV-C31 Successfully launched IRNSS-1E on January 20, 2016 at 09:31 Hrs (IST) from Satish Dhawan Space Centre SHAR (SDSC SHAR), Sriharikota, the spaceport of India.

IRNSS-1F

IRNSS-1F is the sixth navigation satellite of the seven satellites constituting the Indian Regional Navigation Satellite System (IRNSS) space segment. Its predecessors, IRNSS-1A, 1B, 1C, 1D and 1E were successfully launched by PSLV-C22, PSLV-C24, PSLV-C26, PSLV-C27 and PSLV-C31 in July 2013, April 2014, October 2014, March 2015 and January 2016 respectively. All the five satellites are functioning satisfactorily from their designated orbital positions.

IRNSS-1F has a lift-off mass of 1425 kg. The configuration of IRNSS-1F is similar to that of IRNSS-1A, 1B, 1C, 1D and 1E. The two solar arrays of IRNSS-1F consisting of Ultra Triple Junction solar cells generate about 1660 Watts of electrical power. Sun and Star sensors as well as gyroscopes provide orientation reference for the satellite. Special thermal control schemes have been designed and implemented for some of the critical elements such as atomic clocks. The Attitude and Orbit Control System (AOCS) of IRNSS-1F maintains the satellite's orientation with the help of reaction wheels, magnetic torques and thrusters. Its propulsion system consists of a Liquid Apogee Motor (LAM) and thrusters.

IRNSS -1F carries two types of payloads – navigation payload and ranging payload. The navigation payload of IRNSS-1F transmits navigation service signals to the users. This payload is operating in L5-band and S-band. A highly accurate Rubidium atomic clock is part of the navigation payload of the satellite. The ranging payload of IRNSS-1F consists of a C-band transponder, which facilitates accurate determination of the range of the satellite. IRNSS-1F also carries Corner Cube Retro Reflectors for laser ranging.

IRNSS-1F was launched by PSLV-C32 into a sub Geosynchronous Transfer Orbit (sub GTO) on March 10, 2016 at 16:01 hrs (IST) from Satish Dhawan Space Centre (SDSC) SHAR, Sriharikota.

IRNSS-1G

IRNSS-1G is the seventh navigation satellite of the seven satellites constituting the IRNSS space segment. Its predecessors, IRNSS-1A, 1B, 1C, 1D, 1E and 1F were launched by PSLV-C22, PSLV-C24, PSLV-C26, PSLV-C27, PSLV-C31 and PSLV-C32 in July 2013, April 2014, October 2014, March 2015, January 2016 and March 2016 respectively. Like all other IRNSS satellites, IRNSS-1G also has a lift-off mass of 1425 kg. The configuration of IRNSS-1G too is the same as IRNSS-1A, 1B, 1C, 1D, 1E and 1F.

CARTOSAT-2 Series Satellite

The Cartosat-2 series satellite is the primary satellite carried by PSLV-C34. This satellite is similar to the earlier Cartosat-2, 2A and 2B. After its injection into a 505 km polar Sun Synchronous Orbit by PSLV-C34, the satellite was brought to operational configuration following which it will begin providing regular remote sensing services using Panchromatic and Multi-spectral cameras.

The imagery of Cartosat-2 series satellite will be useful cartographic applications, urban and rural applications, coastal land use and regulation, utility management like road network monitoring, water distribution, creation of land use maps, precision study, change detection to bring out geographical and manmade features and various other Land Information System (LIS) and Geographical Information System (GIS) applications.

Launch of PSLV-C34/Cartosat-2 Series Satellite Mission took place on June 22, 2016 at 09:26 hrs (IST) from SDSC SHAR, Sriharikota.

INSAT-3DR

INSAT-3DR similar to INSAT-3D, is an advanced meteorological satellite of India configured with an imaging System and an Atmospheric Sounder. The significant improvements incorporated in INSAT-3DR are:
Imaging in Middle Infrared band to provide night time pictures of low clouds and fog
Imaging in two Thermal Infrared bands for estimation of Sea Surface Temperature (SST) with better accuracy
Higher Spatial Resolution in the Visible and Thermal Infrared bands

And, like its predecessor INSAT-3D, INSAT-3DR carries a Data Relay Transponder as well as a Search and Rescue Transponder. Thus, INSAT-3DR will provide service continuity to earlier meteorological missions of ISRO and further augment the capability to provide various meteorological as well as search and rescue services.

INSAT-3DR has a lift-off mass of 2211 kg, which includes about 1255 kg of propellant. The propellant carried by INSAT-3DR is mainly required to raise the satellite from the Geosynchronous Transfer Orbit (GTO) to its final Geostationary Orbit and to maintain the satellite in its orbital slot during its life. The satellite has a solar array generating 1700 Watts of power.

SCATSAT-1

SCATSAT-1 is a continuity mission for Oceansat-2 Scatterometer to provide wind vector data products for weather forecasting, cyclone detection and tracking services to the users. The satellite carries Ku-band Scatterometer similar to the one flown onboard Oceansat-2. The spacecraft is built around standard IMS-2 Bus and the mass of the spacecraft is 371 kg. The spacecraft will be put in SSP orbit of 720 km altitude with an inclination of 98.1 deg by PSLV-C35. The mission life of the satellite is 5 years.

The SCATSAT-1 was launched by PSLV-C35 on Monday morning at 9:12 hrs (IST) on September 26, 2016 from the First Launch Pad of SDSC SHAR, Sriharikota.

GSAT-18

India's latest communication satellite, GSAT-18 was inducted into the INSAT/GSAT system on October 06, 2016 from Kourou, French Guiana by Ariane-5 VA-231. Weighing 3404 kg at lift-off, GSAT-18 carries 48 communication transponders to provide Services in Normal C-band, Upper Extended C-band and Ku-bands of the frequency spectrum. GSAT-18 carries Ku-band beacon as well to help in an accurately pointing ground antennas towards the satellite.

GSAT-18 is designed to provide continuity of services on operational satellites in C-band, Extended C-band and Ku-bands. GSAT-18 was launched into a Geosynchronous Transfer Orbit (GTO) by Ariane-5 VA-231 launch vehicle. After its injection into GTO, ISRO's Master Control Facility (MCF) at Hassan took control of GSAT-18 and performed the initial orbit raising maneuvers using the Liquid Apogee Motor (LAM) of the satellite, placing it in circular Geostationary Orbit.

The designed in-orbit operational life of GSAT-18 is about 15 years.

ESOURCESAT-2A

RESOURCESAT-2A is a Remote Sensing satellite intended for resource monitoring. RESOURCESAT-2A is a follow on mission to RESOURCESAT-1 and RESOURCESAT-2, launched in 2003 and 2011 respectively. RESOURCESAT-2A is intended to continue the remote sensing data services to global users provided by RESOURCESAT-1 and RESOURCESAT-2

RESOURCESAT-2A carries three payloads which are similar to those of RESOURCESAT-1 and RESOURCESAT-2. They are a high resolution Linear Imaging Self Scanner (LISS-4) camera operating in three spectral bands in the Visible and Near Infrared Region (VNIR) with 5.8 m spatial resolution and steerable up to ± 26 deg across track to achieve a five day revisit capability. The second payload is the medium resolution LISS-3 camera operating in three-spectral bands in VNIR and one in Short Wave Infrared (SWIR) band with 23.5 m spatial resolution. The third payload is a coarse resolution Advanced Wide Field Sensor (AWiFS) camera operating in three spectral bands in VNIR and one band in SWIR with 56 m spatial resolution.

RESOURCESAT-2A carries two Solid State Recorders with a capacity of 200 Giga Bits each to store the images taken by its cameras which can be read out later to ground stations.

PSLV-C36 / RESOURCESAT-2A was successfully launched on December 07, 2016 at 10:25 hrs (IST) from SDSC SHAR, Sriharikota.

2017:


Cartosat -2 Series Satellite


The Cartosat-2 series satellite is the primary satellite carried by PSLV-C37. This satellite is similar to the earlier four satellites of the Cartosat-2 series. After its injection into a 505 km polar Sun Synchronous Orbit by PSLV-C37, the satellite was brought to operational configuration following which it began providing regular remote sensing services using its Panchromatic and Multi-spectral cameras.

The imageries from Cartosat-2 series satellite will useful for cartographic applications, urban and rural applications, coastal land use and regulation, utility management like road network monitoring, water distribution, creation of land use maps, change detection to bring out geographical and manmade features and various other Land Information System (LIS) and Geographical Information System (GIS) applications.

INS-1B

Overall Size:
304 x 246 x 510 mm3 (stowed)
304 x 670 x 510 mm3 (deployed)

Earth Exosphere Lyman Alpha Analyser (EELA) payload from Laboratory for Electro-Optics Systems (LEOS), Bengaluru Registers terrestrial exospheric line-of-sight neutral atomic hydrogen Lyman Alpha flux. Besides, it will estimate the interplanetary hydrogen Lyman-alpha background flux by means of deep space observations.

Origami Camera payload from SAC is a Remote Sensing Colour camera with a novel lens assembly for optical realisation in a small package. There is scope for its future scalability and utilisation in regular satellites.

INS-1A

Overall Size:
304 x 246 x 364.3 mm3 (stowed)
304 x 670 x 364.3 mm3 (deployed)

Surface Bidirectional Reflectance Distribution Function Radiometer (SBR) payload from Space Applications Centre (SAC), Ahmedabad measures the BRDF (Bidirectional Reflectance Distribution Function) of the Earth surface and will take readings of the reflectance of different surface features due to Sun albedo.

Single Event Upset Monitor (SEUM) payload from SAC monitors Single Event Upsets occurring due to high energy radiation in the space environment.

GSAT-9

South Asia Satellite GSAT-9 is a Geostationary Communication satellite realised by India. The primary objective of GSAT-9 is to provide various communication applications in Ku-band with coverage over South Asian countries.

GSAT-9 is configured around the ISRO’s standard I-2K bus. With lift off mass of 2230 kg the main structure of the satellite is cuboid in shape built around a central cylinder. GSAT-9 carries communication transponders operating in Ku-band.

The two solar arrays of GSAT-9 consisting of Ultra Triple Junction solar cells generate about 3500 Watts of electrical power. Sun and Earth sensors as well as gyroscopes provide orientation reference for the satellite. The Attitude and Orbit Control System (AOCS) of the satellite maintains it’s orientation with the help of momentum wheels, magnetic torquers and thrusters. The satellite’s propulsion system consists of a Liquid Apogee Motor (LAM) and chemical thrusters using liquid propellants for initial orbit raising and station keeping. The satellite also carries plasma thrusters, assisting in station keeping.

GSAT-9 was launched by GSLV-F09 on Friday, May 05, 2017 from the Second Launch Pad (SLP) at Satish Dhawan Space Centre SHAR (SDSC SHAR), Sriharikota. .

GSAT-19

GSAT-19 satellite with a lift-off mass of 3136 kg, is the communication satellite of India, configured around the ISRO’s standard I-3K bus.

GSAT-19 carries Ka/Ku-band high throughput communication transponders. Besides, it carries a Geostationary Radiation Spectrometer (GRASP) payload to monitor and study the nature of charged particles and the influence of space radiation on satellites and their electronic components. GSAT-19 also features certain advanced spacecraft technologies including miniaturised heat pipe, fibre optic gyro, Micro Electro-Mechanical Systems (MEMS) accelerometer, Ku-band TTC transponder, as well an indigenous Lithium-ion Battery.

GSAT-19 satellite was launched by GSLV Mk III-D1 on Monday, June 05, 2017 from the Second Launch Pad (SLP) at Satish Dhawan Space Centre SHAR (SDSC SHAR), Sriharikota.

Cartosat-2 Series Satellite

Cartosat-2 Series Satellite is the primary satellite carried by PSLV-C38. This remote sensing satellite is similar in configuration to earlier satellites in the series with the objective of providing high-resolution scene specific spot imagery.

The imagery sent by satellite will be useful for cartographic applications, urban and rural applications, coastal land use and regulation, utility management like road network monitoring, water distribution, creation of land use maps, change detection to bring out geographical and manmade features and various other Land Information System (LIS) as well as Geographical Information System (GIS) applications.

GSAT-17

India's latest communication satellite, GSAT-17 was inducted into the INSAT/GSAT system on June 29, 2017 from Kourou, French Guiana by Ariane-5 VA-238. Weighing 3477 kg at lift-off, GSAT-17 carries Payloads in Normal C-band, Extended C-band and S-band to provide various communication services. GSAT-17 also carries equipment for metereological data relay and satellite based search and rescue services being provided by earlier INSAT satellites.

GSAT-17 is designed to provide continuity of services on operational satellites in C-band, Extended C-band and S-bands. GSAT-17 was launched into a Geosynchronous Transfer Orbit (GTO) by Ariane-5 VA-238 launch vehicle. After its injection into GTO, ISRO's Master Control Facility (MCF) at Hassan takes control of GSAT-17 and performs the initial orbit raising maneuvers using the Liquid Apogee Motor (LAM) of the satellite, placing it in circular Geostationary Orbit.

The designed in-orbit operational life of GSAT-17 is about 15 years.

IRNSS-1H

IRNSS-1H was planned to be launched by PSLV-C39 into a sub Geosynchronous Transfer Orbit (sub-GTO) with a 284 km perigee and 20,650 km apogee with an inclination of 19.2 deg with respect to the equatorial plane.

However, IRNSS-1H Satellite could not be placed into the orbit as mission was unsuccessful.

2018:


Microsat


PSLV-C40 carries a Microsatellite (Microsat) built by ISRO as a co-passenger payload. Microsat is a small satellite in the 100 kg class that derives its heritage from IMS-1 bus. This is a technology demonstrator and the fore runner for future satellites of this series. The satellite bus is modular in design and can be fabricated and tested independently of payload.

INS-1C

Indian Nano Satellite-1C (INS-1C) is another Indian co-passenger payload of PSLV-C40. It is the third satellite in the Indian Nano satellite series. The first two satellites of this series were carried as co-passenger payloads by PSLV-C37 in February 2017. INS-1C carries Miniature Multispectral Technology Demonstration (MMX-TD) Payload from Space Applications Centre (SAC). Data sent by this camera is useful for topographical mapping, vegetation monitoring, aerosol scattering studies and cloud studies.

Cartosat-2 Series Satellite

Cartosat-2 Series Satellite is the primary satellite carried by PSLV-C40. This remote sensing satellite is similar in configuration to earlier satellites in the series and is intended to augment data services to the users.

The imagery sent by satellite will be useful for cartographic applications, urban and rural applications, coastal land use and regulation, utility management like road network monitoring, water distribution, creation of land use maps, change detection to bring out geographical and manmade features and various other Land Information System (LIS) as well as Geographical Information System (GIS) applications.

PSLV-C40/Cartosat-2 Series Satellite Mission was launched on Jan 12, 2018 at 09:29 Hrs (IST) from SDSC SHAR, Sriharikota.

GSAT-6A

GSAT-6A, similar to GSAT-6 is a high power S-band communication satellite configured around I-2K bus. The mission life of spacecraft planned is about 10 years. The satellite will also provide a platform for developing technologies such as demonstration of 6 m S-Band Unfurlable Antenna, handheld ground terminals and network management techniques that could be useful in satellite based mobile communication applications

GSAT-6A was launched by GSLV-F08 on Thursday, March 29, 2018 at 16:56 Hrs (IST) from SDSC SHAR, Shriharikota.

IRNSS-1I

IRNSS-1I is the eighth navigation satellite to join the IRNSS space segment. Its predecessors, IRNSS-1A, 1B, 1C, 1D, 1E, 1F and 1G were launched by PSLV-C22, PSLV-C24, PSLV-C26, PSLV-C27, PSLV-C31, PSLV-C32 and PSLV-C33 in July 2013, April 2014, October 2014, March 2015, January 2016, March 2016 and April 2016 respectively. Like all other IRNSS satellites, IRNSS-1I also has a lift-off mass of 1425 kg. The configuration of IRNSS-1I is similar to IRNSS-1A, 1B, 1C, 1D, 1E, 1F and 1G.

Payloads: Like its other IRNSS predecessors, IRNSS-1I also carries two types of payloads – navigation payload and ranging payload. The navigation payload of IRNSS-1I transmits signals for the determination of position, velocity and time. This payload is operating in L5-band and S-band. Rubidium atomic clocks are part of the navigation payload of the satellite. The ranging payload of IRNSS-1I consists of a C-band transponder, which facilitates accurate determination of the range of the satellite. It also carries Corner Cube Retro Reflectors for LASER Ranging.

IRNSS-1I was launched by PSLV-C41 on Thursday morning, April 12, 2018 at 04:04 Hrs (IST) from SDSC SHAR, Sriharikota.

GSAT-29

GSAT-29 satellite with a lift-off mass of 3423 kg, is a multi-beam, multiband communication satellite of India, configured around the ISRO’s enhanced I-3K bus. This is the heaviest satellite launched from India.

GSAT-29 carries Ka/Ku-band high throughput communication transponders which will bridge the digital divide of users including those in Jammu & Kashmir and North Eastern regions of India. It also carries Q/V-band payload, configured for technology demonstration at higher frequency bands and Geo-stationary High Resolution Camera. carried onboard GSAT-29 spacecraft. An optical communication payload, for the first time, will be utilized for data transmission.

HysIS

HysIS, the primary satellite of PSLV-C43 mission, weighing about 380 kg, is an earth observation satellite configured around ISRO’s Mini Satellite-2 (IMS-2) bus. The primary goal of HysIS is to study the earth’s surface in the visible, near infrared and shortwave infrared regions of the electromagnetic spectrum.

GSAT-11 Mission

India’s next generation high throughput communication satellite, GSAT-11 was successfully launched on December 05, 2018 from Kourou launch base, French Guiana by Ariane-5 VA-246. Weighing about 5854 kg, GSAT-11 is the heaviest satellite built by ISRO.
GSAT-11 is the fore-runner in the series of advanced communication satellites with multi-spot beam antenna coverage over Indian mainland and Islands. GSAT-11 will play a vital role in providing broadband services across the country. It will also provide a platform to demonstrate new generation applications.

GSAT-11 was launched into a Geosynchronous Transfer Orbit and subsequently ISRO's Master Control Facility at Hassan taken over the control of GSAT-11 to perform the initial orbit raising maneuvers using the Liquid Apogee Motor of the satellite for placing it in circular Geostationary Orbit

GSAT-7A

GSAT-7A is the 35th Indian Communication satellite built by ISRO. GSAT-7A Spacecraft is configured on ISRO’s standard I-2000 Kg (I-2K) Bus. The Satellite is built to provide communication capability to the users in Ku-band over the Indian region.

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